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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Ovarian Cancer Discussion Forum

Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby gaara » Mon Nov 19, 2012 5:57 am

It does not have to do with being humane, it has to do with the animal rights people reaching their goal of "one generation and out". They would like to see the end of pets in general. The President of the Humane Society is credited with the above quote. That means sterilize all the dogs in the world and when they die no more pet dogs.

There is NO MEDICAL REASON to neuter a male dog and a ton of longterm health risks.

The animal rights people wont tell you this. They will talk about testicular cancer, well not only do very few dogs get it , it is extremely treatable. Prostate cancer is almost unheard of in dogs, so there goes their other argument. What neutering can do is raise your dogs risk of Bone Cancer, Hermangiosarcoma, othropedic problems and many other healh issues.

There is MEDICAL RESEARCH that backs all this up. The animal rights people only have tlaking points, that they repeat with no research.

Here is an ineteresting and informative article for you to read, and below I will link the actual Mecial Research paper that backs it up.

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Summary of health affects of spay/neuter
The full version of the paper summarized below, complete with all references to the veterinary medical research cited, is available. This paper reports some of the adverse behavioral impacts of early spay/neuter.


--------------------------------------…

An objective reading of the veterinary medical literature reveals a complex situation with respect to the long-term health impacts of spay/neuter in dogs. The evidence shows that spay/neuter correlates with both positive and adverse health effects in dogs. It also suggests how much we really do not yet understand about this subject.

On balance, it appears that no compelling case can be made for neutering most male dogs, especially immature male dogs, in order to prevent future health problems. The number of health problems associated with neutering may exceed the associated health benefits in most cases.

On the negative side, neutering male dogs

if done before maturity, increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) by a factor of 3.8; this is a common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis
increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
triples the risk of hypothyroidism
increases the risk of geriatric cognitive impairment
triples the risk of obesity, and with it many of the associated health problems
quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract cancers
increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations

On the positive side, neutering male dogs

eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
For female dogs, the situation is more complex. The number of health benefits associated with spaying may exceed the associated health problems in some (not all) cases. On balance, whether spaying improves the odds of overall good health or degrades them probably depends on the age of the female dog and the relative risk of various diseases in the different breeds.



On the positive side, spaying female dogs

if done before 2.5 years of age, greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors, the most common tumors in female dogs
nearly eliminates the risk of pyometra, which otherwise would infect about 23% of intact female dogs; pyometra kills about 1% of intact female dogs
reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
removes the very small risk (<0.5%) from uterine, cervical, and ovarian tumors
On the negative side, spaying female dogs

if done before maturity, increases the risk of osteosarcoma by a factor of 3.1; this is a common cancer in larger breeds with a poor prognosis
increases the risk of splenic hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 2.2 and cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of more than 5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
triples the risk of hypothyroidism
increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6 – 2, and with it the many associated health problems
causes urinary spay incontinence in 4-20% of female dogs
increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs spayed before puberty
doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract tumors
increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
One thing is clear—much of the spay/neuter information that is available to the public is unbalanced and contains claims that are exaggerated or unsupported by evidence. Rather than helping to educate pet owners, much of this has contributed to common misunderstandings about the long-term health impacts of spay/neuter in dogs.

The traditional spay/neuter age of six months as well as the modern practice of pediatric spay/neuter appear to predispose dogs to health risks that could otherwise be avoided by waiting until the dog is physically mature, or (perhaps in the case of many male dogs) foregoing it altogether unless medically necessary.

The balance of long-term health risks and benefits of spay/neuter will vary from one dog to the next. Across-the-board assertions that spay/neuter will improve the health of all pet dogs do not appear to be supportable from findings in the veterinary medical literature. This is especially true of spay/neuter before physical maturity.

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf
gaara
 
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby rickie75 » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:03 am

Why do certain humans insist on anthropomorphizing DOGS?
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby boyn » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:11 am

Oh lovely, another man who associates a dog's balls with his own.

Is it more humane to euthanize millions of dogs a year? Or how about cutting out female dogs' uteruses?
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby garrick » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:16 am

I don't find it inhumane.
People who "humanize" dogs or compare their dog's balls to their own balls do.
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby rae4 » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:21 am

Why do we find it humane to cut of a baby's foreskin but we freak out about a dog's balls?

Dogs don't care about their balls. They don't know they had them to begin with and certainly don't know enough to miss them. Big deal.
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby ruadhagan » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:32 am

hahaha, the term is nuder, but we do it because we don't want our dog to mate with another dog to produce pups
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby naseem » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:46 am

Because it's far more humane than having a lot of puppies and dogs end up in kill shelters when you could keep them from breeding in the first place.
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby ahimelech » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:53 am

because controlling the population by castration is more humane than controlling with euthanasia and gas.


There's nothing inhumane about preventing certain types of cancers.
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby anakausuen99 » Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:57 am

Because otherwise, we have unwanted litters of puppies, which many can't or don't want to support, so the puppies are abused or neglected.
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Why do we find it humane to cut dogs balls off?

Postby berthold100 » Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:04 am

Because one male dog can produce hundreds of unwanted puppies. And neutering your dog doesn't adversely affect your sex life, honest.
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