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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma causes, treatment and diagnosis discussion

What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby jager15 » Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:47 am

Mesothelioma is always malignant it is cancer of the mesothelium. In this case it started in the mesothelium of the abdomen. Mesothelioma is mesothelioma whether it starts in the pleura of the lungs, the abdomen, testis, etc. it is all the same.
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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby bailintin » Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:54 am

www.asbestos.com/mesothelioma/
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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby fogarty » Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:55 am

Its a cancer of the stomach lining that is caused by asbestos exposure.
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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby knocks » Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:57 am

PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA
Peritoneal mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the abdominal cavity, is less common than the pleural form, comprising approximately one-fifth to one-third of the total number of mesothelioma cases diagnosed. According to the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) database, these diagnoses are approximately 54.7 per cent male versus 45.3 per cent female, with the median age being 65-69. The latency period appears to be shorter for asbestos-exposed individuals with symptoms appearing 20-30 years after exposure rather than the 30-40 year latency more commonly associated with pleural mesothelioma.

Symptoms
Clinical symptoms at the time of presentation may include abdominal pain, abdominal mass, increased abdominal girth, distention of the abdomen, ascites (fluid in the abdomen), fever, weight loss, fatigue, anemia and digestive disturbances. Some patients complain of more non-specific symptoms for a number of months prior to a confirmed diagnosis. In a percentage of cases, peritoneal mesothelioma is found incidentally when the patient has sought help for another health problem such as gallbladder, hernia or pelvic mass.

Diagnosis
As with all mesotheliomas, the diagnosis of peritoneal mesothelioma can be challenging. CT findings may help differentiate between the two clinical types of peritoneal mesothelioma, termed “dry” or “wet”, since their appearances are very different upon imaging. In the “dry” type, CT may reveal multiple small masses or a single dominant localized mass. There is normally little or no ascites. In the “wet” type, CT may reveal widespread small nodules, but no dominant mass. Ascites is usually present.

If fluid is present, it may be removed in a procedure called paracentesis. Unfortunately, as is the case with pleural mesothelioma, fluid analysis offers limited diagnostic value. It is normally a tissue biopsy obtained in a laproscopic exploratory that will yield a definitive diagnosis.

Staging
There is currently no established staging system for peritoneal mesothelioma, and if the disease is staged, it is normally done in accordance with the TNM system, the most common general cancer staging system. This system refers to the status of the tumor (T), lymph nodes (N) and metastases (M). There are general categories which may also be somewhat helpful in determining stage.

The first category shows a localized lesion able to be completely resected (entirely removed). In the second category, the disease is contained within the abdominal cavity on peritoneal and organ surfaces where debulking (the removal of as much, but not all of the tumor) is possible. Category three shows disease contained within the abdominal cavity with invasion of organs such as the colon or liver. Category four shows disease extending outside the abdominal cavity.

Treatment
In recent years, multimodality treatment of peritoneal mesothelioma has become more common for a select patient population, since surgery alone and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy alone have proven to be similarly ineffective. Cytoreductive (debulking) surgery involves the removal of all or nearly all visible tumor, and, depending on the physician’s choice, may be combined with Intra-Peritoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy (IPHC), intraperitoneal chemotherapy and/or radiation. Dr. Paul Sugarbaker has written "intraperitoneal chemotherapy gives high response rates within the abdomen because the peritoneal space to plasma barrier provides dose intensive therapy." Since it is not always possible to remove all tumors, the prognosis for long-term survival may be based on the completeness of cytoreduction as established by the following criteria:
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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby sampson » Wed Apr 13, 2011 10:05 am

PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA
Peritoneal mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the abdominal cavity, is less common than the pleural form, comprising approximately one-fifth to one-third of the total number of mesothelioma cases diagnosed. According to the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) database, these diagnoses are approximately 54.7 per cent male versus 45.3 per cent female, with the median age being 65-69. The latency period appears to be shorter for asbestos-exposed individuals with symptoms appearing 20-30 years after exposure rather than the 30-40 year latency more commonly associated with pleural mesothelioma.

Symptoms
Clinical symptoms at the time of presentation may include abdominal pain, abdominal mass, increased abdominal girth, distention of the abdomen, ascites (fluid in the abdomen), fever, weight loss, fatigue, anemia and digestive disturbances. Some patients complain of more non-specific symptoms for a number of months prior to a confirmed diagnosis. In a percentage of cases, peritoneal mesothelioma is found incidentally when the patient has sought help for another health problem such as gallbladder, hernia or pelvic mass.

Diagnosis
As with all mesotheliomas, the diagnosis of peritoneal mesothelioma can be challenging. CT findings may help differentiate between the two clinical types of peritoneal mesothelioma, termed “dry” or “wet”, since their appearances are very different upon imaging. In the “dry” type, CT may reveal multiple small masses or a single dominant localized mass. There is normally little or no ascites. In the “wet” type, CT may reveal widespread small nodules, but no dominant mass. Ascites is usually present.

If fluid is present, it may be removed in a procedure called paracentesis. Unfortunately, as is the case with pleural mesothelioma, fluid analysis offers limited diagnostic value. It is normally a tissue biopsy obtained in a laproscopic exploratory that will yield a definitive diagnosis.

Staging
There is currently no established staging system for peritoneal mesothelioma, and if the disease is staged, it is normally done in accordance with the TNM system, the most common general cancer staging system. This system refers to the status of the tumor (T), lymph nodes (N) and metastases (M). There are general categories which may also be somewhat helpful in determining stage.

The first category shows a localized lesion able to be completely resected (entirely removed). In the second category, the disease is contained within the abdominal cavity on peritoneal and organ surfaces where debulking (the removal of as much, but not all of the tumor) is possible. Category three shows disease contained within the abdominal cavity with invasion of organs such as the colon or liver. Category four shows disease extending outside the abdominal cavity.

Treatment
In recent years, multimodality treatment of peritoneal mesothelioma has become more common for a select patient population, since surgery alone and/or intraperitoneal chemotherapy alone have proven to be similarly ineffective. Cytoreductive (debulking) surgery involves the removal of all or nearly all visible tumor, and, depending on the physician’s choice, may be combined with Intra-Peritoneal Hyperthermic Chemotherapy (IPHC), intraperitoneal chemotherapy and/or radiation. Dr. Paul Sugarbaker has written "intraperitoneal chemotherapy gives high response rates within the abdomen because the peritoneal space to plasma barrier provides dose intensive therapy." Since it is not always possible to remove all tumors, the prognosis for long-term survival may be based on the completeness of cytoreduction as established by the following criteria:
"Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer in which (cancerous) cells are found in the mesothelium, a protective sac that covers most of the body's internal organs." The disease then proceeds to affect the abdomen wall or in this case, the peritoneum. It then goes on to infect a serious of membranes in the region as well as the membranes that enclose several other major organs. Mesothelioma is most oftenly found in people who have in some way inhaled asbestos particles or other air born particles at their job or place of residence. While there is no connection between mesothelioma and smoking, which is a major factor in lung cancer. Although, smoking has not been proven to cause mesothelioma, it has been found to increase the risk of other asbestos-induce cancer. Of the 2.6 million annually diagnosed cases of mesolthelioma, 15% to 20% are peritoneal mesothelioma. For a more expansive overview of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma, visit the website listed below.
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What is malignant peritoneal mesothelioma?

Postby luxovious » Wed Apr 13, 2011 10:09 am

Malignant mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer in which malignant cells are found in the sac lining the chest or abdomen. Exposure to airborne asbestos particles increases one's risk of developing malignant mesothelioma. The cancer typically develops 20 to 40 years after a person's initial exposure to asbestos. In the United States 18,068 deaths in the United States were attributable to malignant mesothelioma from 1999 to 2005 according to a study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).[1]
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