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Two Cats Vs Three

Leukemia and blood cancer discussion.

Two Cats Vs Three

Postby Hadwin » Mon Jun 06, 2016 12:15 am

Currently we have two indoor cats - not related, both spayed females, that we adopted from animal shelters, one in 2006 and the other in 2007 - both were 6-8 week old kittens.  We have about 6 to 8 feral kittens in our neighborhood.  Our neighbors have been actively working with a Rescue league to get them spayed/neutered.  Unfortunately, some have eluded the live traps.  As a result another litter of kittens has been born.  I am seriously thinking about bringing one into my home.  Is there any big difference to having 3 cats indoors, than 2?  What about sex - should I add a female or male?  My two get along great and are very social.  Any suggestions or warnings?  Should I stay away since the parents are feral?. Thanks, Renee
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Two Cats Vs Three

Postby rush » Mon Jun 06, 2016 6:22 am

Renee,

Having two cats really aren't much different than having three. Gender isn't really much of a factor provided that you have the kitten spayed or neutered as soon as he/she comes of age. The decision that needs to be made is more about whether the kittens are wanting to be social with humans and if they are willing to adapt to indoor life. Rescuing a wild kitten may be more heartbreaking than you realise if you are unable to gain her trust. In the event that one or more of the kittens are social enough you can bring one inside, but you must keep him isolated from your resident cats to avoid the spread of disease or parasites. I would recommend that you have a kitten thoroughly vetted before bringing her into your home and have any parasites treated so that they don't spread to your cats. The best way to prepare your resident cats for their new "sibling" is to keep the kitten in a room behind a closed door once he has been adopted by you for a period of 2-3 weeks. On the up side, it is much easier to introduce a new kitten into the household than it would be to introduce an adult cat. The isolation period serves a couple of purposes. The isolation period serves as a quarantine period that can prevent the spread of infections or viruses. The 2-3 week period of isolation also helps your resident cats to get used to the idea of a new family member gradually. If you decide to open your home and heart to one of these little kittens you should be aware that any new kitty coming into your home should be tested for contagious feline illnesses such as feline leukemia and FIV(aka "kitty AIDS"). If the kitten tests positive you will want to be sure not to allow the kitten to have access to your resident cats. If the kitten tests negative for these serious chronic health conditions then it is wise to vaccinate according to your vet's recommendations. The new kitten should be treated for internal and external parasites as well. It is a good idea to feed the resident cats and the new kitten on opposite sides of a closed door so that they can get familiar with each other's scents. All in all there are many things to consider when you are making the decision about whether or not you would like to add a kitten whose mother was a feral or stray cat. Veterinary expenses, potential for chronic, progressive health issues to be a consideration, space, time, training, respect for your resident cats' territory and what goes into dealing with a new kitten. Ultimately I can't offer anything other than information about the health risks and how to best introduce your resident cats to a new kitten. This is a decision of the heart and there are no right or wrong answers, but I do feel that it is important that you know about the types of health issues that the kitten may have, what risk these issues may pose to your resident cats and the potential for very expensive veterinary bills in the near future. Good luck with whichever decision you choose. I hope that you have found this information helpful. If you have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me again.
rush
 
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Two Cats Vs Three

Postby Barraq » Mon Jun 06, 2016 3:50 pm

Currently we have two indoor cats - not related, both spayed females, that we adopted from animal shelters, one in 2006 and the other in 2007 - both were 6-8 week old kittens.  We have about 6 to 8 feral kittens in our neighborhood.  Our neighbors have been actively working with a Rescue league to get them spayed/neutered.  Unfortunately, some have eluded the live traps.  As a result another litter of kittens has been born.  I am seriously thinking about bringing one into my home.  Is there any big difference to having 3 cats indoors, than 2?  What about sex - should I add a female or male?  My two get along great and are very social.  Any suggestions or warnings?  Should I stay away since the parents are feral?. Thanks, Renee
Barraq
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:20 am


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