Welcome to Cancer-Forums.net!   

Advertisments:



Useful Links:

American Cancer Society
National Cancer Institute
Cancer Definition

Tumor Of Mandible

Discussions relating to bone cancer symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

Tumor Of Mandible

Postby Bevan » Tue Jun 28, 2016 5:18 am

Dr. Teig, I have recently been diagnosed with a large tumor of the mandible.  I am scheduled for a biopsy this week and am pretty terrified of the surgical procedure to follow.  I am seeing a maxilofacial surgeon and to quote him, "The tumor is so large, if it were cancer, you would be dead.  "It(the tumor) has completely engulfed the mandible".  I haven't spoke with him since the initial visit and am very concerned about the type of surgery that will need to be done as well as recovery time, getting back to work etc....  I am 44 years old and have had this bulge on my left mandible for quite some time and I scheduled my appointment because i felt like it was getting bigger.

ANSWER: Sherry -  Depending on the exact location of the tumor, the biopsy procedure involves making a small opening in the bone after making a gum incision to expose the bone.  The surgery itself involves exposing the bone via making an incision to expose the bone in the area of the tumor.  A hole is made in the bone and the tumor is scooped out.  

Depending on the extensions of the tumor, small tags of tissue may more firmly attach in certain areas.  Sometimes, secondary bony exposure incisions need to be made to get access to the entire tumor. If the tumor is so large that is weakens the jaw, you jaw may need to be treated like a broken jaw.  Saying that, you might have to have your teeth closed to together during the healing to prevent jaw injury.  In addition, in the middle of the lower jaw is a nerve that provides sensation to your lower teeth, the lip and chin.  With the tumor removal, you may have some numbness after the surgery.

If you could be a little more specific as to the exact area of the tumor and how large it is compared to the jaw in the area, I might give you a better idea of what will be done and the potential problems.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Thank you Dr. Teig; the tumor from what i can see and feel is about the size of a gulf ball on the outer rim, but seems to engulf the entire mandible from the very back molar space up to the first of the four front teeth.  I am very concerned that this may be an en bloc resection and would like to know the procedure and recovery time.  Thanks again, Sherry
Bevan
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon Jan 20, 2014 12:33 pm

Tumor Of Mandible

Postby Derreck » Tue Jun 28, 2016 6:56 am

Dr. Teig, I have recently been diagnosed with a large tumor of the mandible.  I am scheduled for a biopsy this week and am pretty terrified of the surgical procedure to follow.  I am seeing a maxilofacial surgeon and to quote him, "The tumor is so large, if it were cancer, you would be dead.  "It(the tumor) has completely engulfed the mandible".  I haven't spoke with him since the initial visit and am very concerned about the type of surgery that will need to be done as well as recovery time, getting back to work etc....  I am 44 years old and have had this bulge on my left mandible for quite some time and I scheduled my appointment because i felt like it was getting bigger.

ANSWER: Sherry -  Depending on the exact location of the tumor, the biopsy procedure involves making a small opening in the bone after making a gum incision to expose the bone.  The surgery itself involves exposing the bone via making an incision to expose the bone in the area of the tumor.  A hole is made in the bone and the tumor is scooped out.  

Depending on the extensions of the tumor, small tags of tissue may more firmly attach in certain areas.  Sometimes, secondary bony exposure incisions need to be made to get access to the entire tumor. If the tumor is so large that is weakens the jaw, you jaw may need to be treated like a broken jaw.  Saying that, you might have to have your teeth closed to together during the healing to prevent jaw injury.  In addition, in the middle of the lower jaw is a nerve that provides sensation to your lower teeth, the lip and chin.  With the tumor removal, you may have some numbness after the surgery.

If you could be a little more specific as to the exact area of the tumor and how large it is compared to the jaw in the area, I might give you a better idea of what will be done and the potential problems.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

Thank you Dr. Teig; the tumor from what i can see and feel is about the size of a gulf ball on the outer rim, but seems to engulf the entire mandible from the very back molar space up to the first of the four front teeth.  I am very concerned that this may be an en bloc resection and would like to know the procedure and recovery time.  Thanks again, Sherry
Derreck
 
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:01 pm

Tumor Of Mandible

Postby shannon81 » Tue Jun 28, 2016 7:26 am

Sherry - If the tumor has completely eroded the jaw bone an en bloc resection might be the best course of treatment to completely remove the tumor. An en bloc involves actually cutting away the bone leaving a gap between the bone on either side of the tumor.  At that point, the surgeon may elect to use a metal bar to stabilize the jaw into the proper relationship.  At that time, the surgeon may elect to leave the jaw stabilized only with the metal bar until he can be sure that no additional tumor tissue remains.  At that point, once sure of all tumor removed, a bone graft can be taken from the hip and that can be used to fill the space in the bone.  

Full recovery varies on the healing and need for additional surgery.  It can take anywhere from 6 months to a year for full healing.  I wish you well.  If you have additional questions, feel free to contact me again.
shannon81
 
Posts: 1011
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:58 pm


Return to Bone Cancer

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post