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The Progression Of Liver Failure.

Liver Cancer research, treatment and diagnosis discussion

The Progression Of Liver Failure.

Postby Rowe » Fri Apr 01, 2016 10:25 pm

Hello,  I would be really grateful for  some information and advise about Liver failure and how it progresses. My sister is 35 and has been diagnosed in the passing months with Liver Failure due to long term alcohol dependency. I have tried to do as much research as I can to support her but cannot find any information on how quickly it may progress – I realise it depends on the person but I would like a rough idea to prepare myself. She was informed while in hospital that she has roughly 10- 15%liver function left and if she were to give up alcohol for 6 months would be placed on a waiting list for a transplant.

However, she has been detoxed twice but has since relapsed and drinks at least 8 cans of strong larger a day. She has had her stomach drained due to fluid build up and has jaundice and swollen hands, feet and face. She seems to be in complete denial at the moment and everything we try and help her with fails. I am worried that soon it will be to late and wonder if you could advise what the next stages would be of her liver failure.

Thank you Kind regards
Rowe
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2014 7:20 pm

The Progression Of Liver Failure.

Postby Roscoe » Sat Apr 02, 2016 1:24 am

Hello,  I would be really grateful for  some information and advise about Liver failure and how it progresses. My sister is 35 and has been diagnosed in the passing months with Liver Failure due to long term alcohol dependency. I have tried to do as much research as I can to support her but cannot find any information on how quickly it may progress – I realise it depends on the person but I would like a rough idea to prepare myself. She was informed while in hospital that she has roughly 10- 15%liver function left and if she were to give up alcohol for 6 months would be placed on a waiting list for a transplant.

However, she has been detoxed twice but has since relapsed and drinks at least 8 cans of strong larger a day. She has had her stomach drained due to fluid build up and has jaundice and swollen hands, feet and face. She seems to be in complete denial at the moment and everything we try and help her with fails. I am worried that soon it will be to late and wonder if you could advise what the next stages would be of her liver failure.

Thank you Kind regards
Roscoe
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 5:11 pm

The Progression Of Liver Failure.

Postby Thomdic » Sat Apr 02, 2016 8:34 am

Hello Lou and thanks for writing, I am sorry to read about your sister’s struggle with alcohol.

The liver is the largest glandular organ of the body. The liver receives 30% of the resting cardiac output and acts as a giant chemical processing plant in the body. These chemical reactions, called metabolism, are central in the regulation of body homeostasis. The liver cells, called Hepatocytes, contain thousands of enzymes essential to perform vital metabolic functions. The liver metabolises both beneficial and harmful substances. It stores nutrients and other useful substances, as well as detoxifying or breaking down harmful compounds. These can be then excreted from the body in bile via the liver; in urine via the kidney, or by other means.

Among the most important liver functions are:

•   Removing and excreting body wastes and hormones as well as drugs and other foreign substances,

•   Synthesizing plasma proteins, including those necessary for blood clotting(if the liver is damaged or diseased, it can take longer for the body to form clots),

•   Producing immune factors and removing bacteria, helping the body fight infection,

•   Producing bile to aid in digestion,

•   Excretion of bilirubin,(Bilirubin is one of the few waste products excreted in bile. Macrophages in the liver remove worn out red blood cells from the blood. Bilirubin then results from the breakdown of the hemoglobin in the red blood cells and is excreted into bile by hepatocytes. Jaundice results when bilirubin cannot be removed from the blood quickly enough due to gallstones, liver disease, or the excessive breakdown of red blood cells),

•   Storing certain vitamins, minerals, and sugars, and

•   Processing nutrients absorbed from digestive tract.

Alcoholic cirrhosis usually develops after more than a decade of heavy drinking. Many people with cirrhosis have no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. However, as scar tissue replaces healthy cells, liver function starts to fail and a person may experience the following symptoms:

•   Exhaustion

•   fatigue

•   loss of appetite

•   nausea

•   weakness

•   weight loss

•   abdominal pain •   spider-like blood vessels(spider angiomas) that develop on the skin Complications of Cirrhosis

Loss of liver function affects the body in many ways. Following are the common problems, or complications, caused by cirrhosis.

Edema and ascites. When the liver loses its ability to make the protein albumin, water accumulates in the legs(edema) and abdomen(ascites).

Bruising and bleeding. When the liver slows or stops production of the proteins needed for blood clotting, a person will bruise or bleed easily. The palms of the hands may be reddish and blotchy with palmar erythema.

Jaundice. Jaundice is a yellowing of the skin and eyes that occurs when the diseased liver does not absorb enough bilirubin.

Itching. Bile products deposited in the skin may cause intense itching.

Gallstones. If cirrhosis prevents bile from reaching the gallbladder, gallstones may develop.

Toxins in the blood or brain. A damaged liver cannot remove toxins from the blood, causing them to accumulate in the blood and eventually the brain. There, toxins can dull mental functioning and cause personality changes, coma, and even death. Signs of the buildup of toxins in the brain include neglect of personal appearance, unresponsiveness, forgetfulness, trouble concentrating, or changes in sleep habits.

Sensitivity to medication. Cirrhosis slows the liver's ability to filter medications from the blood. Because the liver does not remove drugs from the blood at the usual rate, they act longer than expected and build up in the body. This causes a person to be more sensitive to medications and their side effects.

Portal hypertension. Normally, blood from the intestines and spleen is carried to the liver through the portal vein. But cirrhosis slows the normal flow of blood through the portal vein, which increases the pressure inside it. This condition is called portal hypertension.

Varices. When blood flow through the portal vein slows, blood from the intestines and spleen backs up into blood vessels in the stomach and esophagus. These blood vessels may become enlarged because they are not meant to carry this much blood. The enlarged blood vessels, called varices, have thin walls and carry high pressure, and thus are more likely to burst. If they do burst, the result is a serious bleeding problem in the upper stomach or esophagus that requires immediate medical attention.

Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Cirrhosis causes resistance to insulin. This hormone, produced by the pancreas, enables blood glucose to be used as energy by the cells of the body. If you have insulin resistance, your muscle, fat, and liver cells do not use insulin properly. The pancreas tries to keep up with the demand for insulin by producing more. Eventually, the pancreas cannot keep up with the body's need for insulin, and type 2 diabetes develops as excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream.

Liver cancer. Hepatocellular carcinoma, a type of liver cancer commonly caused by cirrhosis, starts in the liver tissue itself. It has a high mortality rate.

Problems in other organs. Cirrhosis can cause immune system dysfunction, leading to infection. Fluid in the abdomen(ascites) may become infected with bacteria normally present in the intestines. Cirrhosis can also lead to impotence, kidney dysfunction and failure, and osteoporosis.

Alcohol abuse leads to the accumulation of fat within Hepatocytes(the predominant cell type in the liver). Fatty liver is reversible if the patient stops drinking, fatty livers lead to Steatohepatitis(scarring of the liver and cirrhosis).

Alcohol abuse causes acute and chronic Hepatitis. Alcoholic hepatitis can range from a mild Hepatitis, with abnormal laboratory tests being the only indication of disease, to severe liver dysfunction with complications such as: •   Jaundice(yellow skin caused by bilirubin retention), •   Hepatic Encephalopathy(neurological dysfunction caused by liver failure), •   Ascites(fluid accumulation in the abdomen), you’re already seeing this with his distended abdomen

•   bleeding Esophageal Varices(varicose veins in the esophagus), •   abnormal blood clotting, and •   Coma.    

Her abdomen will continue to grow as the ascites expands, and she must be educated about and watch for Esophageal Varices(ugly & very scary). Other common symptoms include: Altered mood and behaviour , Drowsiness , Delirium , Confusion , Restlessness, Incoherent speech, Fits, Coma, Yawning, Tremors of hands, Difficulty with fine movements of hands, Sweet smelling breath, Itchy skin, Enlarged liver , Abdominal pain, Nausea, Malaise, Vomiting, Diarrhoea, Vomiting or coughing up blood, Hyperventilation, Breathing difficulties & Breathlessness. The most important measure in the treatment of alcoholic liver disease is to ensure the total and immediate abstinence from alcohol. This will sometimes require admission to an in-patient medical ward for prophylactic treatment of withdrawal symptoms such as delirium tremors and seizures. Treatment of other associated neurological conditions may also be required. Chronic alcohol abusers often need treatment with vitamins, especially Thiamin, to correct the deficiencies that may have resulted from chronic alcohol abuse. Intensive medical treatment of the complications of acute alcoholic hepatitis or cirrhosis is also sometimes necessary, as is the treatment of concurrent infectious and/or metabolic disorders. The basic treatment for Ascites is bed rest and a salt-restricted diet, usually combined with drugs called Diuretics(water pills), which make the kidneys excrete more water into the urine. If Ascites makes breathing or eating difficult, the fluid may be removed through a needle - a procedure called Therapeutic Paracentesis. The fluid tends to reaccumulate unless the person also takes a Diuretic. Because a large amount of Albumin(the major protein in plasma) is usually lost from the blood into the abdominal fluid, Albumin may be administered intravenously.

Moderate-to-severe accumulations of fluid are treated by draining large amounts of fluid(large-volume Paracentesis) from the patient's abdomen. This procedure is safer than diuretic therapy. It causes fewer complications and requires a shorter hospital stay. Large-volume Paracentesis is also the preferred treatment for massive ascites. Diuretics are sometimes used to prevent new fluid accumulations, and the procedure may be repeated periodically. An infection called spontaneous bacterial Peritonitis occasionally develops in Ascitic fluid for no apparent reason, especially in people with alcoholic Cirrhosis. Untreated, this infection can be fatal. Survival depends on early vigorous treatment with antibiotics.

Dietary alterations, focused on reducing salt intake, should be a part of the treatment. In less severe cases, herbal diuretics like dandelion(Taraxacum officinale) can help eliminate excess fluid and provide potassium. Potassium-rich foods like low-fat yogurt, mackerel, cantaloupe, and baked potatoes help balance excess sodium intake.

If her condition worsens and you’d like to read about the common stages of death, please refer to:http://en.allexperts.com/q/Life-Support-Issues-2065/dying-process-Parkinson-pati I hope this helped, all my best,

Margot
Thomdic
 
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Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 4:10 am

The Progression Of Liver Failure

Postby RogozinSat » Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:08 am

when used with radiation of course we cant kick radiation under the bus just yet ehI wonder if they tried using cannabis with say, vitamin C also
RogozinSat
 
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Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2016 9:31 pm
Location: Россия


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