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Prognosis for secondary Osteosarcoma stage II?

Lung Cancer discussions, another of the most common forms of cancer

Prognosis for secondary Osteosarcoma stage II?

Postby clerc53 » Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:57 am

A friend had esophageal cancer in January 2012, had been in remission, and found out this week that it has metastasized to osteosarcoma stage II. Everything I'm reading is giving him a poor prognosis, from 3 months to 2 years to live with a small chance of survival. Can anyone give me a better idea of his prognosis?
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Prognosis for secondary Osteosarcoma stage II?

Postby kinnell36 » Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:05 am

That would not be osteosarcoma stage II your friend does not have osteosarcoma -it would be esophageal cancer stage 4 and it is not curable. Most people with esophageal cancer die within 10 months of diagnosis.


Most patients die within 10 months of diagnosis at any stage, with a 5 year survival rate of less than 10%. At stage 4 chemo is given to decrease symptoms and hopefully prolong the patient’s life.

From a treatment perspective it is esophageal cancer, because it is still esophageal cancer it does not matter if it is in the lung, brain, bone, etc. We are only allowed a 3% error rate in this job if I did not know the difference between the two no one would hire me.
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Prognosis for secondary Osteosarcoma stage II?

Postby bond » Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:06 am

Long-term cancer prognoses cannot be made with any precision. By looking at statistics you have already lost sight of the fact that some people survive this cancer with complete remission. There's no way to predict which people will beat the odds.

Any secondary cancer has a poor prognosis because if its in one place, its likely to be in another, and it means the cancer cells have a lower likelihood of responding to treatments. Anything can happen from a rapid deterioration to complete remission, with an unfavorable outcome being more likely - this is the most accurate prognosis since it includes the entire range of possible outcomes.

The previous response about esophageal cancer stage 4 might be what a registrar uses to record this cancer in the books, but from a treatment perspective its osteosarcoma, which is obviously treatable.
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