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How can I pass a cigarette smoking test? Do I need to?

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How can I pass a cigarette smoking test? Do I need to?

Postby landers » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:26 am

I'm thinking of doing a non-invasive clinical test. They have said I need to have not smoked for 45 days, come the trial it will only be 30 days. I'm guessing they will do a hair test. My question is A) How can I pass it? and B) will I even need to? If the hair test only checks for nicotine I could blame it on patches etc. Or maybe the test checks for other cigarette chemicals?
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How can I pass a cigarette smoking test? Do I need to?

Postby salem97 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:32 am

I guess I'm just confused why you're going to need to take a cigarette smoking test? Unless it's to do something involving heart problems or possibly a lung screening. If you haven't smoked in 30 days, I would like to say you'll be fine, If in fact you do fail, you can blame it on patches, or second hand smoke.

Actually, I think they'll ask you about patches and what not, but if you're really strapped for cash, just do it.
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How can I pass a cigarette smoking test? Do I need to?

Postby ceannfhionn6 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:33 am

why would you ruin the studies results by not following the guide lines you are a very selfish person
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How can I pass a cigarette smoking test? Do I need to?

Postby claud28 » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:37 am

Guidelines for clinical trials are rigid and important and it is inappropriate to try and cheat them.

A number of biochemical markers have been used to validate claims of nonsmoking, including measures based on thiocyanate, 4-7 nicotine, 8 cotinine, 9-11 and carbon monoxide.4, 6, 11, 12 These measures differ widely in availability, cost, and ease of administration. Measures based on nicotine have the advantage of being specific to tobacco but require expensive laboratory instrumentation. Levels of thiocyanate and carbon monoxide are much easier to determine but may be raised through exposures unrelated to smoking, such as traffic emissions and diet. Few studies have attempted to compare the various biochemical tests.
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