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Bladder Tumor

All discussions relating to bladder cancer symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

Bladder Tumor

Postby Gustavo » Mon Apr 18, 2016 4:27 pm

My father has been diagnosed to have bladder tumor(CAT scan and blood test, but don't know if it is cancerous or not) after he noticed blood in urine. The doctor suggested surgery regardless what kind of tumor it is.

My questions are, how big or how big of a deal is the surgery? What is the successful rate of the surgery - will it completely cure the problem, are there chances for the problem to come back? Are their any other options we should know about?

Thanks in advance for your response!
Gustavo
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2014 5:18 am

Bladder Tumor

Postby Ashenford » Mon Apr 18, 2016 7:19 pm

Lena, bladder cancer is the 4th most common cancer in men and the 8th highest in females.  The incidence of this neoplasm increases with age and is 2-3 times more common in men than in women.  This cancer originates in the lining of the urinary bladder and accounts for 90% of cancers that occur in the lining the entire urinary tract.  The patient will typically present with the gross passage of blood in the urine or with irritative urinary symptoms.  Although your father's CT scan was suspicious for cancer of the bladder, the diagnosis is generally made by cystoscopic examination of the bladder which shows the typical cauliflower like tumor(s) on a pedicle of varying thickness.  Some tumors may be more solid and broad based.  These tend to be more aggressive and have a worse prognosis.  Although the gross appearance is characteristic, biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis and to evaluate the grade and stage of the tumor.  The grade is based on microscopic examination of the cancer cells and varies from one for the least to 4 for the most malignant.  The stage measures the depth of penetration into the balder wall and is classified similarly.  After the diagnosis is established, and depending on the grade and stage, other test may be needed to evaluate the extent of the tumor such as CT or MRI scans of the abdomen and pelvis.  Low grade noninvasive tumor are usually cured by TUR(transurethral resection) of the tumor.  This is the initial step of treatment and what is going to be scheduled for your father.  This in itself is relatively minor as it is done through endoscopes under anesthesia and there is no incsiion.   High grade or stage tumors may require more intensive therapy such as radiation, chemotherapy or radical surgical removal of the bladder.  Even low grade tumor have a tendancy to recur so life long periodic evaluation is necessary to try and detect recurrences early.  Sometimes, especially in a patient with multiple tumors on presentation or many recurrences, instillation of medication into the bladder is used to try and prevent such episodes.  Some of the agents used for this include BCG, mithramycin, thiotepa, etc.  A lot more needs to be learned about your father before being able to answer your questions completely.  However, at least statistically, most bladder tumors are low grade and stage and are thus cured by TUR of the neoplasm.  Good luck.
Ashenford
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2014 11:36 am

Bladder Tumor

Postby Gwayne » Tue Apr 19, 2016 11:43 am

My father has been diagnosed to have bladder tumor(CAT scan and blood test, but don't know if it is cancerous or not) after he noticed blood in urine. The doctor suggested surgery regardless what kind of tumor it is.

My questions are, how big or how big of a deal is the surgery? What is the successful rate of the surgery - will it completely cure the problem, are there chances for the problem to come back? Are their any other options we should know about?

Thanks in advance for your response!
Gwayne
 
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 2:42 am


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