Welcome to Cancer-Forums.net!   

Advertisments:



Useful Links:

American Cancer Society
National Cancer Institute
Cancer Definition

After Thyroid Cancer, And Removal Of Thyroid, And Kemo , Now My Body Is Making Thyroid Again, ???? Cancer?

Learn about Thyroid Cancer

After Thyroid Cancer, And Removal Of Thyroid, And Kemo , Now My Body Is Making Thyroid Again, ???? Cancer?

Postby Chaim » Tue Aug 12, 2014 2:16 am

thyroid was removed, and kemo done now a year later the body is making its own thyroid, the want to do another scan, what could this mean and has anyone ever heard of this , this is my daughter in her late 20, could this mean the Dr, missed some of her thyroid during the operation? he said he removed the whole thing and some glands, I am just worried sick about this does anyone out there have any answers, or know about this ??? thanks
Chaim
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 4:39 am

After Thyroid Cancer, And Removal Of Thyroid, And Kemo , Now My Body Is Making Thyroid Again, ???? Cancer?

Postby Gilpin » Tue Aug 12, 2014 2:21 am

The thyroid IS a gland...perhaps you mean he removed some lymph nodes?

Thyroids don't "make" thyroid, it is a gland that helps regulate your metabolism.

Lastly, if the Dr. failed to remove all of the gland, you should sue him...
Gilpin
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2014 12:56 pm

After Thyroid Cancer, And Removal Of Thyroid, And Kemo , Now My Body Is Making Thyroid Again, ???? Cancer?

Postby Dayne » Tue Aug 12, 2014 2:38 am

Even when a "total thyroidectomy" is performed for thyroid cancer, we tend to leave a small amount of tissue behind.
This is because there are some extremely important structures near the thyroid gland, such that injuring them would be a problem as bad or worse than thyroid cancer! The most notable of these are the parathyroid glands, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and the superior laryngeal nerve.

Typically after a cancer operation for the thyroid, a scan is performed to see if there is any iodine-avid tissue remaining.
This scan is done with I-123, a radioactive iodine that can be "seen" using a gamma camera.
This is doubly useful because locations outside of the thyroid that "light up" are suggestive of disease which has spread to lymph nodes or to the lung.
After this, I-131 can be given which is another radioactive iodine with a little more "punch" to it.
This not only concentrates in this tissue so that it can be imaged with a gamma camera, but it also delivers a dose of localized radiation which destroys the remaining thyroid tissue or cancer spread.

These iodine-based treatment schemes depend on the thyroid tissue and the thyroid disease being based on the iodine concentrating thyroid follicular cells.
There are other types of thyroid cancer (such as medullary thyroid cancer) which does not respond to iodine treatments because the cell type is not the type which takes up iodine.
Over 90% of thyroid cancers are of the follicular cell line in one way or another, and respond to radioactive iodine after surgery.

Young people (under age 55) tend to do better than older people with the same type of disease.
Also, the microscopic grade of the disease plays a factor, the extent of the primary tumor at the time of discovery, and the presence or absence of lesions away from the thyroid (metastases).
In general, this is a cancer that people tend to do pretty well with.

I hope that helps!

I could tell you more if you gave more specifics.
Dayne
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 1:17 am


Return to Thyroid Cancer

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post